Category: Goals Strategy Tactics

Meanings in Conversations

CREDIT

That’s not what I said.

That’s not what I meant.

You took it the wrong way.

Why can’t you see things from my point of view?

What I was trying to say was…

In any meaningful conversation, where what’s said and what’s heard is equally important on all sides, the truth is rarely heard simply as stated. Usually, there’s what someone says and then there’s what someone hears. It’s a miracle that we don’t miscommunicate more.

In all honesty, language and conversation is something we take for granted. But in these turbulent, divisive and also promising times, communication is of vital importance. Those who can engage someone empathetically, showing an ability to understand and share the feelings of another, can create bridges that sow divides and create thriving communities.

But you have to care.

You have to believe in something bigger than yourself or any one person or thing.

The vision and meaning of togetherness must carry greater purpose and prominence collectively…for all.

The difference between utterance and discernment, after all these centuries of communicating with one another, still leaves much to be desired. Dialogue is so much more complicated than speaking and listening. The distance between the two is separated by an incredible array of everyday obstructions: cognitive biases, experiences, emotions, and self-centeredness on every side.

The art and science of language and communication are just that…art and science. Expression and significance are often left to the senses of the beholder, regardless of intent.

Let’s appreciate that the coalescence of thoughts, ideas, and purpose create a complex stream that’s truly unique to each person. Someone has to take the first step. Someone has to see the bigger picture. Someone has to understand the other…first.

Regardless of what is or what should be and why, most times, other people aren’t going to take the first step. But that’s the true opportunity for empathetic leadership.

Don’t just try to get closer.
Don’t just listen.
Don’t just repeat what you head back to someone.
Don’t just feel sorry for someone…that’s sympathy, not empathy.

Empathetic leadership is just that…leading the way by taking steps toward someone and somewhere else. Become a bridgebuilder.

Listen and commit your undivided attention to the conversation.
Ask questions.
Refrain from judgment and assumptions.
Consider different perspectives and angles.
Seek common ground.
Acknowledge another’s feelings and show emotional support (EQ=emotional intelligence)
Relate – show care and concern.
Mirror someone’s form of communication and nonverbal signals.

Empathetic leadership is a skill and a competitive advantage. In a world seemingly rife with divisiveness, fear, and confusion, this is exactly what the world needs more of right now…engagement, harmony, and community.

Take the first step.

The Learning/Doing Gap

Seth Godin

Our society separates them. Somewhere along the way, we decided that one interfered with the other.

Go to school for 8 years to become a doctor–most of that time, you’re learning about doctoring, not actually doing doctoring.

Go to work as a copywriter. Most of the time, you’re doing writing, not learning about new ways to write.

The thing we usually seek to label as ‘learning’ is actually more about ‘education’. It revolves around compliance, rankings and “will this be on the test?”

Being good at school is not the same as learning something.

One reason that we don’t incorporate doing into education is that it takes the authority away from those that would seek to lecture and instruct.

There are 56 million people in K-12 (compulsory education) in the US right now. Most of them do nothing all day but school, failing to bring real-life activity, experimentation and interaction into the things that they are being taught.

And there are more than a hundred million people going to their jobs every day in the US, but few of them read books or take lessons regularly about how to do their work better. That’s considered a distraction or, at best, inconvenient or simply wasted time.

The gap is real. It often takes a decade or more for a profession to accept and learn a new approach. It took gastroenterologists a generation before they fully accepted that most ulcers were caused by bacteria and changed their approach. It has taken our justice system more than thirty years to take a hard look at sentencing and corrections.

It could be because we’re confusing learning with education. That education (someone else is in charge and I might fail) is a power shift from doing, so I’d rather be doing, thank you very much.

What happens if the learning we do is accomplished by always engaging in it in conjunction with our doing?

And what happens if we take a hard look at our doing and spend the time to actually learn something from it?

When police departments invest time in studying their numbers and investigating new approaches, they discover that efficacy and productivity goes up, safety improves and so does job satisfaction.

When science students devise and operate their own lab tests, their understanding of the work dramatically improves.

Education (the compliance-based system that all of us went through) is undergoing a massive shift, as big as the ones that have hit the other industries that have been rebuilt by the connection and leverage the internet brings. And yet, too much of the new work is simply coming up with a slightly more efficient way to deliver lectures plus tests.

I see this every day. People show up at Akimbo expecting lifetime access to secret videos, instead of the hard but useful work of engagement.

The alternative? Learning. Learning that embraces doing. The doing of speaking up, reviewing and be reviewed. The learning of relevant projects and peer engagement. Learning and doing together, at the same time, each producing the other.

If you want to learn marketing, do marketing. If you want to do marketing, it helps to learn marketing.

That same symmetric property applies to just about everything we care about.

To quote the ancient rockers, “We don’t need no… education.”

But we could probably benefit from some learning.

In the middle of all this doing, this constant doing, we might benefit from learning to do it better.

Marketing the Ranch

Marketing – The process of creating excitement about your product/service.
Sales – The process of actually selling your product/service.

Sales of the product on the Ranch – You have that figured out. Sales barns, video, and internet, they all get the job done very well with the largest number of potential buyers.

But – Marketing, that has been left up to the barns/video/internet sales facilitators. And how do they go about doing that. – The Sale Bill. The consignment list they post in publications and websites.

That’s IT!!!!!!

Why should you take an interest in “Marketing your Livestock”
Picture this – If there are 2 more bidders at the sale to BID on your livestock. 50,000 lbs at $1.10 = $55,000.
With 2 more bidders you could get say .05 +/- cents more?
50,000 lbs at $1.15 = $57,500.
$2500 More….

What can you do to “Market your Livestock”?
Website – $500 a year.
Print Media – $500 a year.
Social Media – $100 a year.

  • Take lots of pictures
  • Write down what you do.
  • Write down your genetics
  • Ad pictures to everything.

The more visual you are the more your pictures will sell your Calves.

Build upon the reputation that you already have.
By Investing $1.00 in your Marketing – You can get $2.00 back.

I can HELP – call 307.331.0357

8 traits for effectively leading the family ranch forward

Want your family business to succeed and transition to the next generation? It starts with being an effective leader.

Amanda Radke | Mar 27, 2019

I received a phone call from a college student yesterday. He was a freshman studying animal science and had been assigned the task of interviewing beef industry leaders to learn about their careers and to gain advice and insights for their own futures in agriculture.

I took the call while driving to a FFA fundraiser where I was speaking, and he asked me a wide variety of questions. What would you do differently in your college years? What advice would you give to a college student wanting to be involved in the industry? Who do you look up to in agriculture? What motivates you in your career? Why is it so difficult to bridge the gap between consumers and producers?

Honestly, the conversation spurred many ideas for future blog posts.

However, one question in particular got me thinking during my road trip. He asked me, “What challenges do you face on your family ranch?”
Admittedly, I had a hard time answering at first. Our problems seem so “common,” and I wasn’t sure which one to pinpoint as a challenge worth noting. Do we communicate well? Is our transition plan solid? Does our multi-generational business operate as smoothly as it could? Is there room for improvement?

I decided to go the route of transition planning. Depending on the day, my dad will say he’s retiring in one year or 15 years. To me, that uncertainty is one of the biggest challenges my husband and I will face in the upcoming years.

We certainly don’t want to “push” him out before he’s ready. On the contrary, I could use a little more time to get my own affairs in order, so I feel confident and financially secure to purchase assets as he transitions into retirement.

It’s just the unknowing. How soon will we need to be ready? What will a purchase agreement look like? How much can we take on?

In thinking about those variables, I noticed I was placing the burden squarely on my folks to figure everything out. That’s when I realized that I hadn’t necessarily expressed these concerns or vocalized how much or how little we were willing to take on, should my parents decide they are ready to retire.

So I made a goal for myself — to schedule a meeting for all of us this summer. The discussion of this family business meeting wouldn’t necessarily be on the “when,” but on the “hows,” so when the time comes to transition the operation into new leaders — whether that’s six months or six years from now — we’ll know what the plan is and how it will be executed.

I’m sure it will take more than one discussion, but we’ve got to start somewhere, and it needs to start with me. By being transparent in my own goals and plans and by being willing to communicate and walk through all scenarios and potential pitfalls, I hope it will be a seamless transition that leaves the business intact and the family harmonious.

I recently read an article that addresses what it takes to be an effective leader in the family business. Written by Steve Moyer for SKM Associates, the article recaps management guru Peter Drucker’s list of traits that make for a great executive in the business. Although it was written from the perspective of what it takes to be a good executor of an estate, I think it applies whether you’re a Millennial or Boomer producer working with another generation in a family business.

Drucker’s list includes:

1. Ask what needs to be done.

He says, “Get the knowledge you need by asking what needs to be done, and take the answers seriously. Failing to ask this question will render the leader ineffective. Once you know the to-do list, set priorities and stick to them.”

2. Ask what’s right for the enterprise.

“Don’t focus on what’s right for individuals (i.e. owners, family members, employees or customers.),” writes Drucker. “What is right for the enterprise may not be right for individual stakeholders or family members.”

3. Develop action plans.

“Set a plan that specifies results and constraints compatible with family and organizational goals,” he advises. “Create check-in milestones and revise your plan as necessary to reflect new opportunities or insight.”

4. Take responsibility for actions.

“Ensure each decision specifies the person accountable and the appropriate deadline,” says Drucker. “Define whom it affects and whom to keep updated and informed.”

5. Take responsibility for communicating.

6. Embrace change.

7. Run productive meetings.

8. Say “we” not “I”

Read Drucker’s tips in full by clicking here.

I would love to hear what has worked for your family in effectively running business meetings, guiding conversations and making meaningful and lasting decisions for the operation and the family. Please email me your advice to amanda.radke@informa.com. Thanks!

Is Average Good Enough for You?

Kit Pharo – Pharo Cattle Company

As silly as it sounds, average is good enough for most cow-calf producers.   In agriculture, average is breakeven.   Below average producers are losing money.   The only way they can stay in business is to subsidize the farm or ranch with outside income.   Above average producers are profitable.   A few are extremely profitable.   They are profitable because they do things differently from status quo (average) producers.   They have a distinct competitive advantage.

Most PCC Customers are well above average.   Many have doubled or tripled their profits.   They are focused on production per acre – instead of production per cow (bragging rights).   They are using ultra-low-maintenance bulls – instead of the status quo, high-maintenance bulls everyone else is using.   They know stocking rate affects profitability, or lack thereof, more than anything else.

Ag economist Danny Klinefelter explains how you can get a competitive edge simply by rejecting the status quo.   That’s right… by rejecting the status quo!   Klinefelter says, “The only truly sustainable competitive advantage today is the ability to learn and adapt faster than your competition.”   Click on the link below to listen to what he has to say.

Reject the Status Quo

Following the crowd and doing what everyone else is doing is never the best way to manage a business.   In most cases, it is the absolute worst way to manage a business.   If you are part of the status quo herd, you will never be above average – and you will never have a competitive advantage.   Dare to be different.   Dare to be a Herd Quitter.

Quote Worth Re-Quoting –

“If you don’t have a competitive advantage, don’t try to compete.”   ~ Jack Welch

Learning in Tough Times

Learning in Tough Times

Posted August 23rd, 2009 — Filed in Bud’s Musings

If you are a person who likes to learn or needs to learn, these last two years should have been wonderful.  The next two years may be even better.  We can’t change the world but we can learn how to live and do business in it better.

We are going through a time period now that has a chance to educate a lot of people. Maybe that should be, a chance to relearn some things that have been forgotten or ignored. People go to a University and pay a lot of money for the possibility of learning something. Now we have a situation where very large to very small businesses also have the possibility to learn something. This may cost a lot more than going to the University but there is the potential to learn some things that will have a lot more value.

Some of our largest companies forgot or never knew the most basic things of good business practices.  They did things that never should have been done. Now they get to pay for the education.  Did they learn, or do they just get to pay for it?  We have many small businesses that did the same things, it just may not cost them as much.  The education might cost less but it could be just as valuable. Individuals also had a chance to get a good education with possibly very little cost.

Everyone should have learned something about debt or borrowing money. Most of the time the people that loan money expect it to be paid back and with something they call “interest” added on.  “It is easier to borrow money when prices are high than it is to pay it back when prices are low.” These are good things to know.

Something else that is good to know is that “When it is easy to borrow money to expand the business other people are also expanding.”  Another good thing to learn is “When things are good and everybody is expanding their businesses it is possible that there may be some over production.”  Here is another good lesson “Over producing tends to bring low prices and it may be hard to pay the debt off with low prices.”

Maybe when business is good we should save money instead of borrow more. Then when prices go down we would have money instead of owe money. When we decide to expand it should be with some of our money, maybe not all, but some.

Invest money in things you know something about or invest very little and then only money you already have. Buy things you have the money to pay for.  If you don’t have enough money to pay then buy less or smaller. To save money takes very little effort and you don’t have to spend money to save, it also can make money. Learn to save and how to make money not just how to spend. To make money takes effort and you may have to spend money to gain or hope to make money, just try to spend money that you have.

The large and small companies that had and are having financial problems had people that were well educated at our finest educational centers. They had all the newest equipment and technology  to work with, yet they had these problems. Most of their education or at least what they learned was how to spend money, when they should have been learning how to make and then save money.

This is what we should learn from this problem that “emotion is trying to make bigger than it is.”  Develop as much skill at your job or business as you can then learn how to make, save, and manage money, not just how to spend it. It’s not necessary to own half the world by the time you are 21 years old. Learn and really understand what you want to accomplish, then start doing things as properly as possible. Then you can really own what you have not just have payments to make on something that might be gone with the first little down turn in the economy.  Things are so good now that it is easy to get over extended.  Because of spending money that people didn’t have, they say things are bad. The only thing bad is the people who keep telling us how difficult things are.

When things are like this there is opportunity everywhere. If we lose money, a job, a business,  the knowledge we gained should have been worth more than the money, job, or business was worth. That will make it easier to get started and be more successful than before. Or we can learn nothing because of complaining and feeling sorry for ourselves. If we lose a business it must have had very little value or it could have been sold for a large amount and everything would still be alright. Sometimes to lose a business that has very little value can actually be a good thing, then we can start over and do things better and have a business that is worth a great deal. If we lose a job it is the same thing, we should have learned enough that a new and better job is easy to find.

Learn all you can, these next few years should be fun, just like the last fifty have been. After all, we get to decide how good or bad they are.  I’ve decided that they are good, that’s why I can        Smile and Mean it.

Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 1

By   /  February 25, 2019  /

We think it is far more important to stop making hay on your land than it is to stop feeding hay on your land. Here are some things to think about.

What Made Sense in 1973 Doesn’t Make Sense Today

Making hay is a whole lot more expensive than it used to be. This table compares input costs for making hay in 1973 in contrast to 2013.

 

All of the input costs have increased at a much faster rate than the value of beef cattle, lamb, or milk. To be on par with costs experienced in 1973, fed cattle should have been $284/cwt, not the $148 they were.

Hay = Inexpensive Fertility

While making hay is expensive, in much of the US, hay can be bought for less than the cost of production. When you buy someone else’s hay and feed it on your property, you are buying their fertility at a highly discounted rate. In some years in some locations, you can buy beef cattle hay for less than the fertilizer value it contains.

This is a great opportunity for improving your land in a way that also benefits soil health.

Feeding Uniformly is the Key

The key to soil improvement is to get the hay fed uniformly over your pastures. This is how you can realize the greatest benefit from purchased hay as a planned fertility input.

Large round bales are still the norm in much of US cow country. Round bales can be unrolled with relatively low-cost equipment. Bales don’t unroll uniformly all the time, but the subsequent manure distribution is way better than feeding bales in ring feeders.

Big square bales can be flaked off easily in a systematic way to cover a specific area with each bale fed.

Bale processors are expensive pieces of equipment. If you are invested in something like this, make sure you are feeding all of your hay to optimize the distribution of manure across the pasture.

We need to be thinking about how much nitrogen and phosphorus is in each bale we are feeding so we can plan our daily feeding to apply appropriate levels of nutrients rather than feeding too little and not realizing the benefit we expected or feeding too much and overloading the soil and environment with excess N. We’ll look at that next week!

Stay tuned! Jim will be covering all the data and math in this series to help us figure out how to do the best we can at improving pastures with hay feeding. If you have questions for Jim, do share them in the comments section below!